COMMITTEE SECTORS HISTORY
OF SRI LANKA GDP USD 82.5 Billion Annually Currently Sri Lanka has a GDP of 75 Billion USD and yearly , 1.2 billion is added as a deficit to the economy. And currently 96% of the GDP we service as public debt. Against this back drop, the development of infrastructure and other areas seem to have been hampered,and the quality of life of the citizens paints a bleak future. Any of the top ten tech companies of the world boasts an annual growth of more than our GDP of USD 75 billion and a less than 100,000 work force. Sri Lanka has a total population of 22 million,out of which we have over 22 % in public service, 31% in agriculture, and 38% in the service sector.

21st century software will disrupt most traditional industries in the next 5-10 years. Uber is a mere software tool; they don't own any cars, butare the biggest taxi company in the world. AIRBNB is the biggest hotel company in the world, yet they don’t own any property.

This year,Infotelis completing 25 years and taking on the theme, ‘Towards a Digital Economy’. We have devised a strategy, breaking the economy into 7 sectors and each sector having a unique strategy to increase productivity and reduce waste, making each sector increase efficiency by 10% year-on-year, finally reaching a maximum efficiency of 60%.It is envisaged that this will help decrease public debt and grow our GDP as much as 50-60% in 5 years.

 

The system we have devised is by not having an extra burden on the CAPEX, which will increase our public debt,but merely increasing the efficiency. 100%
 INTRODUCTION
8.7%
3.8%
OF SRI LANKA GDP USD $3.1 BILLION USD 118 PER PERSON

Public sector health services have been, and continue to be, the backbone of the health sector in Sri Lanka.  The growth in the proportion of the aged population of the country is expected to alter the overall disease profile and therefore affect the volume and types of services required.  Also, prosperity related changes in lifestyle which include regionally high levels of exposure to alcohol, tobacco and sedentary behavior have exacerbated the incidence of non-communicable diseases.  The demographic and epidemiological shifts, increasing prosperity, education and awareness levels, all have contributed to elevated health care-seeking behavior.  The improvement in purchasing power of the citizens, coupled with actual and perceived gaps in quality and availability of public health services have contributed to increased demand for health services delivered by the private sector.

 

The state sector under the Ministry of Health operates the largest number of hospitals in the country – 593, and dominates the inpatient segment.  However, healthcare expenditure directed towards the private sector accounted for almost 55 percent of total healthcare expenditure in 2012.  And, the private sector caters to 60 percent of the outpatients, but caters only to one tenth of inpatients in the country.  There are approximately 197 private hospitals distributed island wide.

 

 

It is now widely accepted that achieving smarter health and wellness requires changes not only in health-care delivery, but also in how patients are engaged and informed so that they have better health outcomes.  By providing new and more efficient ways of accessing, communicating, and storing information, ICTs can help bridge the information divides that exist in the health sector between the health professionals and the communities they serve, and between the producers of health research and the practitioners who need it.

 

ICT in the health sector can be used in the four broad areas of education, research, referral, and management of data.  Sri Lanka is embarking on a new wave of development in the health sector through adaptation of ICT and the time is most opportune for innovators to step in with cheap, fast, and smart health care for citizens through ICT solutions!

 

 

 

 

* Exploit the potential of mobile devices, services and applications to support self-management, behavioral modification, and “participatory healthcare” by patients.

 

 

* With the explosion of mobile health and social media use ICTs to deliver prevention and wellness messages to help people change their lifestyle and behaviors to prevent disease and maximize well-being.

 

 

* Mining Big Data of patients and converting them into meaningful information to be used at the point of care, giving due consideration to acceptance, privacy, and usability issues.

 

OF SRI LANKA GDP USD 5.1 Billion Annually 41% of Land Mass 31% of the working population OF SRI LANKA GDP 9% FOR LOGISTICS USD 18 Billion & 14% ON TRANSPORT 23%

Agriculture is the most important sector of the Sri Lankan economy.  It is also the most important source of employment for much of the Sri Lankan workforce.  The livestock sector in Sri Lanka is small, consisting mainly of the dairy and poultry subsections.  Forestry and fishing are less important components of the economy.

 

Having access to timely and accurate information and services that is tailored to specific locations and conditions is critical in helping those involved in agriculture make the most of their resources in often changing circumstances.  Therefore, ICT and data ecosystems could support the development and delivery of timely, targeted localized information and services to make farming profitable and sustainable.  With its enormous growth and reach, ICTs can empower farmers and help them to make informed decisions through improving their access to the latest and most useful agricultural techniques, as well as by offering a wide range of solutions to some agricultural challenges.  It is time to explore the already possible and soon-to-be potential of tools like block chain, drones, sensors, augmented reality, predictive analytics, big data, gamification, and automation, that will move us from talk to ICT for agriculture action!

The key components to support the implementation of Digital Agriculture is Spatial (and Temporal) Data Infrastructure (SDI) and low cost smart phones and tablets to support the bidirectional flow of data and information to rural consumers.  Agriculture is a data-intense enterprise when one considers soil variability, moisture and nutrient levels, rainfall variability, timing of key operations like planting and harvesting, and market price volatility.

In the developed world, advanced agriculture industries help farmers manage these production and market risks through the application of spatial / temporal data bases that are cloud enabled and integrated through Application Programming Interfaces (APIs).  This creates a rich and dynamic data ecosystem that enables advanced analytics to inform farmers of the best economic options to maximize profitability and minimize risk – the two critical variables that farmers would like to manage.

 

 

 

As the Figures show our efficiency in this sector remains very low and our productivity needs to increase in many folds. And wastage also remains high due to not having proper storage facilities. Post harvesting wastage before reaching the market also remains high.  High price fluctuations have also resulted in farmers being the poorest as a community continues to remain a highly subsidized industry, adding billions to public debt.

 

Agriculture is the most important sector of the Sri Lankan economy, utilising41% of our land mass. It is also the most important source of employment for much of the Sri Lankan workforce, employing31% of the population. However, it only contributes 6% of the GDP. The livestock sector in Sri Lanka is small, consisting mainly of the dairy and poultry subsections.  Forestry and fishing are less important components of the economy.

 

 What we hope to achieve through the digitization is bring a holistic approach, from production to the delivery, and build a system where we farm on demand.

 

 

 

 

The transport sector in Sri Lanka plays a critical role in its economic and social development, contributing up to 14 percent of its GDP.  The country depends heavily on its public transportation system with buses and trains forming the core of the system.  Roads dominate the country’s transportation landscape for both passenger and freight movements, accounting for 93 percent of total passenger traffic and 97 percent freight traffic in 2012.

 

However, it has failed to meet the demands necessary for the country to sustain higher levels of economic growth.  New challenges have continued to be placed on the sector in relation to traffic congestion. Average speed has dropped to 7km/h, wasting time and money, as well as contributing to environmental pollution

It has become necessary to manage the key areas with data analysis;managing the next generation of connectivity to help notify the public with a view to reducing traffic congestion and enabling smoother transition of public transport. .

 

1. Traffic monitoring apps

2. Public transport apps for drivers and passengers

3. Goods transport apps optimizing usage

4. Parking app 9 (studies have shown that as much as 38% of traffic is added during search for parking)

 

Explore the potential of ICTs converging with mobile networks to move conventional transportation into the next generation of transport systems and services, where the three traditional three major entities of transportation – transport facility, transport mode, and humans – are to be connected systematically to provide real-time information exchange amongst all of them.

 

Collection of Big Data from roadways and its management in local and global data centers, with a view to providing more effective information for designing better transport policies and for enhancing transport services to the final users.

 

 Exploit simple, cheap, and easy Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) to achieve safer, smarter, and greener transport services resulting in people being provided with incentives to change their daily trip patterns and travel behavior under the new circumstances.

Visual displays on bus stands with accurate commute times and arrivals

 

 

 

 

Ø Explore possibilities of deploying the national transport systems in terms of “Cloud Transport System”, based on shared transport infrastructure and modes, rather than being owned by a single operator, enabling users with value-added smart and green trip plan services in accordance with a multi-modal transport connectivity.

 

Ø Focus on integrated transport information services to be put in place on people’s mobile phones to provide people with a networked smart journey or trip planner services according to their daily schedule.  This would help integrate reservations, payments, and information on public transport.

 

Use of real time information in relation to public transport to provide travelers with updated information on timings and schedules to reduce user frustration and bring in transparency.

Ø Real time information flow in transportation to help avoid traffic jams and navigation routing to enhance user experience and travel convenience to passengers.

 

Ø Internet of Things (IoT) technologies coupled with Big Data analytic techniques to transform contemporary transportation solutions through better tracking, predicting, scheduling, and preventive maintenance.

 

 

* 278 SHIPS GO PAST US ON THE MOST BUSIEST SHIPPING LANE

* SILK ROAD IS CROSSING US

* 4/3  OF THE WORLDS POPULATION LIVES CLOSE TO SRI LANKA AND THEY ARE THE HIGHEST GROWING MIDDLE INCOME COUNTRIES;

INDIA, CHINA, INDONESIA

*Sri Lanka is used as a transit point for all Pharmaceuticals

* Sri Lanka to be used for e-commerce trading,with smart warehousing and distribution

* Sri Lanka to be used as a courier HUB for e-commerce;all distribution for bordering countries in Indian Ocean

*Automation of ware housing and distribution

*Through analyzing big data find optimum time of distribution and routes through AI and Machine learning

 

 

WATER MANAGEMENT AND DISTRIBUTION WEATHER PREDICTIONS AND CONNECTED ON DEMAND FARMING CONNECTED LOGISTICS ON DEMAND REDUCING THE POST HARVEST WASTAGE BY 40-50%

BIG DATA MANAGEMENT

FOR FUTURE PREDICTIVE

FARMING AND ACCURATE

MITIGATION OF

FOOD SHORTAGES

 

SMART PARKING WILL REDUCE TRAFFIC UP TO 38% TRAFFIC SYNCHRONIZATION WILL REDUCE TRAFFIC AND CONGESTION AND REDUCE THE COST ON OF TRANSPORT UP TO 40% AUTONOMOUS CARS AND TRUCKS SMART LOGISTICS WITH DISTRIBUTION SMART APPS FOR PUBLIC TRANS PORT DRIVERS AND USERS SUPPLY CHAIN AND LOGISTICS MANAGED HUB FOR THE REGION
80, 000 STUDENTS USD 316 MILLION SPENT FOR OVERSEAS STUDIES $4.5 BILLION GDP OF SRI LANKA 6.0%

DIGITAL CONTENT DEVELOPMENT

 

Educational content / materials in Digital form Digital textbooks / curricula offer various interactive functions and provide the learner with a combination of textbooks, reference books, workbooks, dictionaries and multimedia contents such as video clips, animations and virtual reality, both at school and at home without the constraints of time and space. Digital textbooks can save on costs in the long run.

 

SMART DEVICES

 

Smart devices such as Tabs, smart phones for education

Using mobile technology and smart devices, students improve collaboration, developing IT skills, publishing, sharing and searching for information, creativity, flexibility in terms of space and time, and motivation in their studies. On the other hand, teachers are able to find a unique teaching approach by smart devices and evaluate the students very easily.

 

DIGITAL FLUENCY

 

Making citizens / students digitally literate

Digital fluency creates students' capability in using digital technologies to achieve desired learning outcomes and it is one of the essential foundations of Afor success in 21st century society. Digital Fluency encompasses an array of competencies and understandings that are needed for students to have access to opportunities in our networked, digital societies today and in the future.

 

ONLINE LEARNING PLATFORMS

 

Online Educational opportunities for all

Online learning enables students to grasp concepts more quickly and fully, to connect theory and application more adeptly, and to engage in learning more readily, while also improving techniques, leveraging instructor time, and facilitating the widespread sharing of knowledge. E-learning reduces costs traditionally associated with education (such as for classrooms and educational material), to the point that it becomes affordable to a middle-income nation like Sri Lanka and it will prevent students from going abroad for foreign education as well.

 

DIGITAL CONTENT DEVELOPMENT

 

 

 

SMART DEVICES

 

ONLINE LEARNING PLATFORMS

 

 

 

DIGITAL FLUENCY

 

 

 

Education is the backbone of a nation and ICTs play an increasingly important role in the way we communicate, learn, and live.

 

It represents high promises for the education sector, contributing to universal access to education, equity in education, delivery of quality learning and teaching, teachers’ professional development, and improve education management provided the right mix of policies, technologies, and capacities are in place.  The challenge is then to effectively harness these technologies in a way that serves the interests of learners and the larger teaching community. This is key for Sri Lanka, where it is estimated that Rs. 50 billion is spent annually on foreign education.

 

 Despite the huge potential of ICTs for fostering and enhancing learning, the impact of digital technologies on education itself in Sri Lanka has been shallow.  The investments so far have not resulted in the hoped-for transformations, possibly because the overriding focus on hardware and connectivity has kept back equally powerful strategies including innovation to transform teaching and learning and open up new horizons.

 

 

4.3%
OF SRI LANKA GDP USD $3.5 BILLION
TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS 31.8% OF THE POPULATION 3 MILLION ACTIVE DATA CONNECTIONS HEALTH 31.8% OF THE POPULATION3 MILLION ACTIVE DATA CONNECTIONS EDUCATION 4.5 MILLION CONNECTED STUDENTS AND 10768 SCHOOLS AGRICULTURE 31.8% OF THE POPULATION 3 MILLION ACTIVE DATA CONNECTIONS MANUFACTURING & TRADING DIGITAL CITIZEN

The telecommunication industry is continuing to change at breakneck speed.  Yet, it remains a critical force for growth and innovation.  Faced with ongoing disruption from every side, telecommunications industry players have recognized and are taking advantage of their pivotal enabling role in a digital society.  Their role goes far beyond the mere provision of networks and services and into being catalysts of innovation and transformation, taking advantage of changing customer and industry stakeholder expectations.

 

 

 

 

Growth in the mobile industry has been dramatic by virtually any measure, especially by the data-hungry customers with smart devices.  It paved the way for expansion of service portfolios, including the creation of an array of new applications whose number has skyrocketed.  Now, the players in the digital ecosystem are seeking new points of differentiation to maximize their share of customer spend.  Consequently,the evolution and convergence of technologies have

 blurred the lines that once separated telecom players from the world of information technology. This “border crossing” is opening opportunities for telecom service providers to move beyond equipment, connectivity, and basic voice and data services. They are being stimulated to transform themselves into a platform of opportunities harnessing the digital forces of Mobility & Pervasive Computing, Big Data & Analytics, Social Media, Cloud Computing, Artificial

 

 

 Intelligence Robotics to realign their business processes, products, and services.  Also, IT players are recognizing they have the ability make inroads into the telecom space. This trend signals continuing opportunity for the telecommunications industry, together with its sub sectors, and the world is expecting a change in how these opportunities would be manifested.

 

 

INCREASE IN 
GDP within the next 5 Years
40%
USD 5.1 BILLION ANNUALLY 41% OF LAND MASS 31% OF THE WORKING POPULATION
8.7%

TRADING

* Inter connected smart trading platforms for agriculture, commodities, tea and other areas in the region, making use of the strategic location and geological area

 

Sri Lanka have banking hub in connection with the newly developing Silk Rout

Smarter connecting plat form for trading and commerce for SMES

Smart packaging hub for neighboring countries with state of the art ordering platform for printing and packing

Have a channels for payment gateways such us Bitcoin and paypal to integrate with our local currencies and introduce a platform

*bringing in legislations and tax structures to suit e-commerce and other new emerging trade and currency platforms.

 

MANUFACTURING

 

with the backdrop of the population growth numbers, Automation and process management through softwares with the human interaction.

Automated and IOT enabled devices for process management.

Software development to improve productivity and gain reputation for on time deliveries and monitoring services for offshore management of processors etc.(Smart Office)

 

Supply chain management through software driven platforms reducing processing times increasing  productivity

 

 

ICT FOR SENIOR CITIZENS

 

A growing challenge of the Sri Lanka is the progressive aging of the population, including the risk of a growing gap between the generations. Especially as fast developing new technologies increase the distance between the younger and the older generations. The acquisition of Digital Competence is an important element of supporting active aging, opening up new learning opportunities for this group, either in formal or in informal settings.

 

 Using ICT is also a privileged means of learning while creating benefits across different generations, bringing young people and seniors together and tackling the “digital divide”.  FITIS initiative of ‘ICT Literacy Program for Senior Citizens’ aims to promote ICT literacy among the Senior citizens in Sri Lanka in particular, through island wide awareness programs and workshops by providing/enhancing the Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes towards the ICT in order to keep them active in society.

 

 

WOMEN EMPOWERMENT

 

Federation of IT Industry Sri Lanka (FITIS) and its flagship event – Infotel 2017 National ICT Exhibition are celebrating 25th year anniversary in 2017. In order to benchmark this historic event, FITIS is planning to launch a new initiative to empower women in IT industry, understanding the valuable contribution of women towards the ICT industry and the country as a whole.

In addition, Women in IT Awards program also will be organized concurrently to recognize the outstanding contribution of women towards the development of the ICT Industry.